About Salmonella

From the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks.

About Salmonella Blog

What you need to know during a Salmonella Outbreak

The CDC reports as of October 28, 2021, 808 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 37 states and Puerto Rico. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to October 13, 2021. Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 101 years, with a median age of 37, and 57% are female. Of 505 people with information available, 157 (31%) have been hospitalized. These numbers are likely to grow.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $800 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.

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What is Salmonella?

Salmonella is a bacterium that causes one of the most common intestinal illnesses in the US: salmonellosis. There are many different types, or serotypes, of Salmonella, but they all can cause similar symptoms.

How do you get Salmonella?

The Salmonella bacteria can be present in uncooked or undercooked meat, poultry, eggs, or unpasteurized (raw) dairy products, as well as other foods contaminated during harvest, production, or packaging. Recent outbreaks have been linked to contaminated peanut products, alfalfa sprouts, and cantaloupe.

What are the signs and symptoms of Salmonella?

Symptoms can begin 6 to 72 hours from consumption, and include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and/ or vomiting. Dehydration is a concern, especially in the elderly and very young.

What to do if you become infected with Salmonella?

Seek medical attention. Ask your healthcare provider to test a sample of your stool to confirm or rule out Salmonella infection. The CDC estimates that for every culture-con- firmed case of Salmonella in the US, 39 cases go undetected; many cases of “stomach flu” may be salmonellosis. Most illnesses resolve within 1-2 weeks, but in rare cases, serious complications like bacteremia or reactive arthritis can develop.

How to prevent a Salmonella infection:

Cook poultry to the safe temperature of 165 degrees; use a digital thermometer to check. Avoid undercooked or raw eggs and products containing them. Prevent cross contamination by washing your hands after cooking with raw meats, and thoroughly cleaning all surfaces that you or the raw meat touched (counters, cutting boards, sinks, knives, etc.) Wash hands after handling animals and before eating; pay special attention to hand hygiene when visiting animals at state fairs or petting zoos.

Connect with Marler Clark

Office:

1012 First Avenue
Fifth Floor
Seattle, WA 98104

Hours:

M-F, 8:30 am - 5:00 pm, Pacific

Call toll free:

1 (800) 884-9840

If you have questions about foodborne illness, your rights or the legal process, we’d be happy to answer them for you.