About Salmonella

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About Salmonella Blog

More Salmonella linked to Jif Peanut Butter

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) collected different types of data to investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Senftenberg infections.

Epidemiologic and laboratory data showed that Jif brand peanut butter made people sick.

As of July 27, 2022, this outbreak is over.

As of July 27, 2022, a total of 21 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Senftenberg were reported from 17 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from February 20, 2022, through May 24, 2022.

Sick people ranged in age from less than one to 85 years, with a median age of 59, and 75% were female. Of 13 people with information available, 4 were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. Of the 13 people interviewed, 13 (100%) reported eating peanut butter in the week before they got sick. This percentage was significantly higher than results from a survey of healthy people, in which 57% of respondents reported eating any peanut butter in the week before they were interviewed. This suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from eating peanut butter. All 13 people reported eating Jif brand peanut butter specifically.

Public health investigators used the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that were part of this outbreak. CDC PulseNet manages a national database of DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. DNA fingerprinting is performed on bacteria using a method called whole genome sequencing (WGS). WGS showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples were closely related genetically. This means that people in this outbreak likely got sick from the same food.

FDA conducted WGS analysis on an environmental sample collected at the Lexington, Kentucky, J.M. Smucker Company facility in 2010. The analysis shows that this 2010 environmental sample was closely related genetically to the outbreak strain.

On May 20, 2022, J.M. Smucker Company recalled multiple Jif brand peanut butter types made at the Lexington, Kentucky, facility. Additional companies recalled foods made with Jif brand peanut butter.

What you need to know during a Salmonella Outbreak

The CDC reports as of October 28, 2021, 808 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 37 states and Puerto Rico. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to October 13, 2021. Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 101 years, with a median age of 37, and 57% are female. Of 505 people with information available, 157 (31%) have been hospitalized. These numbers are likely to grow.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $800 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.

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What is Salmonella?

Salmonella is a bacterium that causes one of the most common intestinal illnesses in the US: salmonellosis. There are many different types, or serotypes, of Salmonella, but they all can cause similar symptoms.

How do you get Salmonella?

The Salmonella bacteria can be present in uncooked or undercooked meat, poultry, eggs, or unpasteurized (raw) dairy products, as well as other foods contaminated during harvest, production, or packaging. Recent outbreaks have been linked to contaminated peanut products, alfalfa sprouts, and cantaloupe.

What are the signs and symptoms of Salmonella?

Symptoms can begin 6 to 72 hours from consumption, and include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and/ or vomiting. Dehydration is a concern, especially in the elderly and very young.

What to do if you become infected with Salmonella?

Seek medical attention. Ask your healthcare provider to test a sample of your stool to confirm or rule out Salmonella infection. The CDC estimates that for every culture-con- firmed case of Salmonella in the US, 39 cases go undetected; many cases of “stomach flu” may be salmonellosis. Most illnesses resolve within 1-2 weeks, but in rare cases, serious complications like bacteremia or reactive arthritis can develop.

How to prevent a Salmonella infection:

Cook poultry to the safe temperature of 165 degrees; use a digital thermometer to check. Avoid undercooked or raw eggs and products containing them. Prevent cross contamination by washing your hands after cooking with raw meats, and thoroughly cleaning all surfaces that you or the raw meat touched (counters, cutting boards, sinks, knives, etc.) Wash hands after handling animals and before eating; pay special attention to hand hygiene when visiting animals at state fairs or petting zoos.

Unknown Italian-style meats sicken 36 in 14 States

Outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections

Twenty-three sick people have been reported from 14 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 30, 2021, to July 27, 2021.

Sick people range in age from 4 to 91 years, with a median age of 44, and 67% are male. Of 21 people with information available, 9 have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. Officials also obtained sick people’s shopper records with their consent. Of the 16 people with information, 14 (88%) ate Italian-style meats, including salami, prosciutto, coppa, and soppressata, that can often be found in antipasto or charcuterie assortments; several brands were reported. This percentage was significantly higher than the 40% of respondents who reported eating pepperoni or other Italian-style meats in the FoodNet Population Survey—a survey that helps estimate how often people eat various foods linked to diarrheal illness. This comparison suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from eating Italian-style meats.

Outbreak of Salmonella Infantis infections

Thirteen sick people have been reported from seven states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 9, 2021, to June 24, 2021.

Sick people range in age from 1 to 74 years, with a median age of 41 years, and 31% are male. Of 10 people with information available, 3 have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick and collected their shopper records with their consent. Of the 8 people with information, all (100%) ate Italian-style meats, including salami and prosciutto, that can often be found in antipasto or charcuterie assortments; several brands were reported. This percentage was significantly higher than the 40% of respondents who reported eating pepperoni or other Italian-style meats in the FoodNet Population Survey—a survey that helps estimate how often people eat various foods linked to diarrheal illness. This comparison suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from eating Italian-style meats.

Public Health Actions

Investigators are working to identify which Italian-style meat brands and products are making people sick.

BrightFarms salads linked to Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak in two states

As of July 16, 2021, nine people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium have been reported from two states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 10, 2021, to June 15, 2021.

Sick people range in age from 19 to 61 years, with a median age of 44, and 56% are female. One person was hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Officials from Illinois and Wisconsin interviewed people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick and collected shopper card records to determine what products they bought.

All nine people reported eating leafy greens, and seven (78%) people reported eating prepackaged salads. The percentage of people in this outbreak who ate prepackaged salads was significantly higher than the 38% of respondents from the FoodNet Population Survey who reported eating prepackaged salads in the prior week. This comparison suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from eating prepackaged salads.

Interview data and shopper card records show that six people ate or bought a variety of BrightFarms packaged salad greens before they got sick, including Sunny Crunch, 50/50 Spring & Spinach, Harvest Crunch, and Butter Crisp. FDA conducted a traceback investigation and identified BrightFarms greenhouse farm in Rochelle, IL, as the likely source of packaged salad greens bought by sick people.

On July 15, 2021, BrightFarms recalledexternal icon their packaged salad greens produced in the Rochelle, IL, greenhouse farm.

CDC advises people not to eat, sell, or serve any recalled BrightFarms packaged salad greens.

Coriander recalled because of Salmonella

Olde Thompson LLC. Oxnard, CA in cooperation with the FDA is recalling Olde Thompson and Sun Harvest Organic Ground Coriander in 1.5oz glass jar with flip top closure, Lot # 23632 and 23631 due to possible contamination by Salmonella.

To date no illness have been reported. If you have the recalled product, please do not consume it. Please dispose of the recalled product and its container.

The recalled product is identified and distributed as follows:

Olde Thompson Organic Ground Coriander 1.5oz. in glass jar with flip-top lid.
Sun Harvest Organic Coriander 1.5oz in glass jar with flip-top lid.
UPC code: 400000290942
Sold at Homegoods, Jungle Jim’s International Market and Smart and Final in AZ, CA, Ga, NJ, IN, and OH between May 26th and June 4th, 2021.

The recall affects 626 units Olde Thompson Organic Ground Coriander 1.5oz in glass jar and 150 units of Sun Harvest Organic Ground Coriander 1.5oz in glass jar.
Lot # (s): 23632, 23631 located on the bottom of the jar.

Salmonella is known to cause salmonellosis in humans and animals. Symptoms of salmonellosis include diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever and are known in some cases to be severe enough to require hospitalization and can cause serious complications or death in young children, the elderly, or a person with a compromised immune system. If you have already consumed the product and have concerns about your health, please consult your healthcare provider.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers immediately.

Two types of Salmonella sicken seven

As of May 7, 2021, seven people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Duisburg and Salmonella Urbana have been reported from three states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 31, 2021, to April 8, 2021.

Sick people range in age from 23 to 72 years, with a median age of 26, and 57% are female. Three people have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 2 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. Of the six people interviewed, four (67%) reported eating Jule’s cashew brie – the only common product identified.

Officials from California and Tennessee collected samples of Jule’s cashew brie for testing. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) results showed Jule’s truffle cashew brie collected in both states were contaminated with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Urbana. In addition, the other varieties of Jule’s cashew brie were contaminated with other strains of Salmonella. At this time, we have not identified any sick people who were infected with these other strains.

FDA also collected food samples from Jule’s Foods production facility. WGS results showed that raw cashews from the same lot used to make the recalled brie were contaminated with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Urbana.

FDA is working with the supplier of the raw cashews to ensure that all potentially contaminated products have been withdrawn from the market. The supplier has told their customers not to use any of the cashews. The supplier reported that they do not sell cashews directly to consumers.

FDA is continuing to work with the cashew supplier to determine if additional products may be contaminated.

Salmonella Ground Turkey Outbreak grows to 28 People

As of April 12, 2021, 28 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Hadar have been reported from 12 states – States with Illnesses: Arizona 1, Connecticut 1, Indiana 1, Maine 1, Massachusetts 7, Missouri 1, New Hampshire 1, New Jersey 2, New York 4, North Carolina 3, Pennsylvania 3 and Virginia 2. Illnesses started on dates ranging from December 28, 2020, to March 4, 2021

Sick people range in age from less than 1 to 92 years, with a median age of 49, and 68% are female. Of 19 people with information available, 2 have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 2 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Most people infected with Salmonella experience diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps. Symptoms usually start 6 hours to 6 days after swallowing the bacteria. Most people recover without treatment after 4 to 7 days. Some people – especially children younger than 5 years, adults 65 years and older, and people with weakened immune systems – may experience more severe illnesses that require medical treatment or hospitalization.

Ground Turkey Recall:

  • Nature’s Promise (94% lean 6% fat) – 1 lb packages with dates 1/1, 1/3, 1/4, 1/8, and 1/10
  • Wegman (94% lean 6% fat) – 1 lb and 3 lb packages with dates 1/3, 1/4, 1/8, and 1/10
  • Plainville Farms (93% lean 7% fat) – 1 lb packages with dates 1/10

These products have the establishment number “P-244” inside the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s mark of inspection. They were made on December 18-29, 2020, and were sold nationwide. These products are no longer available in stores, but they could still be in your freezer.

Investigators are working to determine if additional turkey products are linked to illnesses.

Cashew Brie recalled over Salmonella Outbreak

As of April 21, 2021, five people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Duisburg have been reported from three states – California, Tennessee and Florida. Illnesses started on dates ranging from February 1, 2021 to February 27, 2021,

Sick people range in age from 23 to 70 years, with a median age of 26, and 80% are female. Of five people with information available, two have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 2 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. Of the five people interviewed, three (60%) reported eating Jule’s truffle cashew brie – the only common product identified. Two of these people reported eating the cashew truffle brie at the same restaurant on different days.

Officials from California and Tennessee collected samples of Jule’s cashew brie for testing. On April 22, testing results showed that the samples of all varieties of Jule’s cashew brie collected in California were contaminated with Salmonella. WGS is currently being conducted to see if the Salmonella bacteria in these samples are the same bacteria making people sick in this outbreak. Test results of the samples collected in Tennessee are pending.

On April 22, Jule’s Foods recalled all their products, including their cashew brie (see recall noticeexternal icon). CDC advises everyone not to eat, sell, or serve the recalled products. Jule’s Foods has stopped producing and distributing all of their products.

FDA investigators and California Department of Public Health state inspectors are conducting an inspection at the Jule’s Foods production facility. They are also collecting additional product and environmental samples for testing.

What to know about Salmonella

The term Salmonella refers to a specific group of gram-negative bacteria with the potential to cause gastrointestinal distress and other illness (i.e. salmonellosis) in humans. 

Salmonellae are widely distributed in nature and are found in the intestinal tract of wild and domesticated animals and in humans. Salmonella poisoning can occur when a person ingests contaminated fecal particles transmitted by another infected human or animal. Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi, Sendai, and Paratyphi A, B, or C, collectively referred to as typhoidal Salmonella, cause enteric fever. 

Most Salmonella infections are caused by eating contaminated food. One study found that 87% of all confirmed cases of Salmonella are foodborne. Foods of animal origin, including meat, poultry, eggs, or dairy products can become contaminated with Salmonella. Eating uncooked or inadequately cooked food—or food cross contaminated with uncooked or undercooked products—can lead to human infections. In the past two decades, consumption of produce, especially sprouts, tomatoes, fruits, leafy greens, nuts, and nut butters, has been associated with Salmonella illnesses. 

Salmonella infections can have a broad range of illness, from no symptoms to severe illness. The most common clinical presentation is acute gastroenteritis. Symptoms include diarrhea and abdominal cramps, often accompanied by fever of 100°F to 102°F (38°C to 39°C), which develop after an incubation period of between 6 to 72 hours.  Other symptoms may include bloody diarrhea, vomiting, headache and body aches. Reactive arthritis can develop after a Salmonella infection, as can irritable bowel syndrome and other functional gastrointestinal disorders such as constipation, heartburn, and acid reflux.

Peach Salmonella Outbreak is over

A total of 101 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis were reported from 17 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 29, 2020, to August 27, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from 1 to 92 years, with a median age of 43. Sixty-four percent of ill people were female. Of 90 ill people with available information, 28 hospitalizations were reported. No deaths were reported.

In Canada total, there were 57 confirmed cases of Salmonella Enteritidis illness linked to this outbreak in two provinces: Ontario (41) and Quebec (16). Individuals became sick between June and August 2020. Twelve individuals were hospitalized. No deaths were reported. Individuals who became ill were between 0 and 91 years of age. The majority of cases (60%) were female.

Whole genome sequencing analysis showed that an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in Canada was related genetically to this outbreak in the United States. This means that people in both outbreaks were likely to share a common source of infection.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicated that peaches packed or supplied by Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Company were the likely source of this outbreak.

The FDA and regulatory officials in several states collected records from grocery stores where ill people reported buying peaches. These records showed that loose and bagged peaches distributed by Wawona Packing Company, LLC, were sold at multiple grocery stores where ill people bought peaches.

On August 22, 2020, Prima Wawona recalled bagged and bulk, or loose, peaches that they supplied to retailers nationwide. See FDA’s notice for a list of recalled products. Recalled products are past their shelf life and should no longer be available in stores.

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