About Salmonella

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About Salmonella Blog

Salmonella Outbreak linked to Jif Peanut Butter now at 16

Product Distribution: Nationwide

Total Illnesses: 16

Hospitalizations: 2

Last Illness Onset: May 1, 2022

States with Cases: Arkansas (1), Georgia (2), Illinois (1), Massachusetts (1), Missouri (2), Ohio (1), North Carolina (2), New York (1), South Carolina (1), Texas (2), Virginia (1), Washington (1)

The FDA, along with CDC and state and local partners, are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Senftenberg infections linked to certain Jif peanut butter products produced at the J.M. Smucker Company facility in Lexington, Kentucky.

CDC’s review of epidemiological information indicates that five out of five people reported consuming peanut butter and four of the five people specifically reported consuming different varieties of Jif brand peanut butter prior to becoming ill. FDA conducted Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) analysis on an environmental sample collected at the Lexington, KY, J.M. Smucker Company facility in 2010. The analysis shows that this 2010 environmental sample matches the strain causing illnesses in this current outbreak. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that Jif brand peanut butter produced in the J.M. Smucker Company facility located in Lexington, KY, is the likely cause of illnesses in this outbreak.

J.M. Smucker Company has voluntarily recalled certain Jif brand peanut butter products that have the lot code numbers between 1274425 – 2140425 manufactured in Lexington, KY. Photo examples and a list of UPC codes are included below.

FDA’s investigation is ongoing and more information will be provided as it becomes available.

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not eat, sell, or serve any recalled Jif brand peanut butter that have lot code numbers 1274425 through 2140425 (see photo example and UPC list below). This product has a two-year shelf life so consumers should check any Jif peanut butter in their home.

FDA recommends that if you have used the recalled Jif brand peanut butter that have lot code numbers 1274425 through 2140425, you should wash and sanitize surfaces and utensils that could have touched the peanut butter.

UPC Description
5150025516 JIF 16 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025537 JIF 16 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024705 JIF 96 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150024706 JIF 96 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150007565 JIF 40 OUNCE NATURAL CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150008026 JIF 12 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER INTERNATIONAL
5150008051 JIF 3/4 OUNCE PEANUT BUTTER PLASTIC CASE
5150008058 JIF .64 OUNCE NATURAL PEANUT BUTTER PLASTIC CASE
5150021889 JIF 96 COUNT NATURAL PEANUT BUTTER TO GO CASE
5150024114 JIF 36 COUNT CREAMY JIF PEANUT TO GO CASE
5150024130 JIF 8 COUNT CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO
5150024136 JIF 8 COUNT CREAMY PBTR TO GO
5150024137 JIF 4.5 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO
5150024143 JIF 54 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO 36 PACK
5150024163 JIF 28 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024170 JIF 96 COUNT CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO
5150024174 JIF 54 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO 36 PACK
5150024177 JIF 28 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024182 JIF 40 OUNCE NATURAL HONEY
5150024191 JIF 12 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024307 JIF 12 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO
5150024321 JIF 40 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024322 JIF 28 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024331 JIF 4 POUND CAN CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024404 JIF 96 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY TWINPACK
5150024540 JIF 15.5 OUNCE NO ADDED SUGAR PEANUT BUTTER
5150024545 JIF 13 OUNCE SQUEEZABLE POUCH
5150024548 JIF 33.5 OUNCE NO ADDED SUGAR PEANUT BUTTER
5150024545 JIF 13 OUNCE SQUEEZABLE POUCH
5150024572 JIF 13 OUNCE NATURAL SQUEEZE POUCH
5150024572 JIF 13 OUNCE NATURAL SQUEEZE POUCH
5150024769 JIF 80 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150024776 JIF 80 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150025499 JIF 40 OUNCE REDUCED FAT CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025516 JIF 16 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025518 JIF 16 OZ REDUCED FAT CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025530 JIF 16 OUNCE CREAMY OMEGA 3 PEANUT BUTTER
5150025537 JIF 16 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025542 JIF 80 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150025565 JIF 16 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025574 JIF 16 OUNCE NATURAL CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025578 JIF 16 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER HONEY
5150072001 JIF 40 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150072002 JIF 40 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150075007 JIF TO GO 8 PACK 250 GRAM CREAMY
5150041418 JIF 46.5 OUNCE NO ADDED SUGAR PEANUT BUTTER
5150092100 JIF 1.1 OUNCE PORTION CONTROL PEANUT BUTTER 120 COUNT
5150024705 JIF 96 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150024177 JIF 28 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER

If you or someone in your household ate this peanut butter and have symptoms of salmonellosis, please contact your healthcare provider.

Jif Peanut Butter Salmonella Outbreak sickens 14

Yesterday, the FDA, along with CDC and state and local partners, are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Senftenberg infections linked to certain Jif peanut butter products produced at the J.M. Smucker Company facility in Lexington, Kentucky.

Total Illnesses: 14,

Hospitalizations: 2,

Last Illness Onset: May 1, 2022.

States with Cases: Arkansas (1), Georgia (2), Illinois (1), Massachusetts (1), Missouri (1), Ohio (1), North Carolina (1), New York (1), South Carolina (1), Texas (2), Virginia (1), and Washington (1).

CDC’s review of epidemiological information indicates that five out of five people reported consuming peanut butter and four of the five people specifically reported consuming different varieties of Jif brand peanut butter prior to becoming ill.

FDA conducted Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) analysis on an environmental sample collected at the Lexington, KY, J.M. Smucker Company facility in 2010. The analysis shows that this 2010 environmental sample matches the strain causing illnesses in this current outbreak.

Epidemiologic evidence indicates that Jif brand peanut butter produced in the J.M. Smucker Company facility located in Lexington, KY, is the likely cause of illnesses in this outbreak.

J.M. Smucker Company has voluntarily recalled certain Jif brand peanut butter products that have the lot code numbers between 1274425 – 2140425 manufactured in Lexington, KY.

West Virginia Salmonella illness linked to infant formula

The FDA had been investigating complaints of four infant illnesses from three states – Ohio, Minnesota and Texas.  All four cases related to these complaints were hospitalized and Cronobacter may have contributed to a death in one case.

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Bureau for Public Health, in coordination with local health partners, has confirmed the state’s first case of salmonella in an infant as a result of ingesting recalled powdered infant formula.

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced they were investigating four complaints of infant illness related to products produced at Abbott Nutrition’s facility located in Sturgis, Michigan, received from September 6, 2021 to December 18, 2021. Complaints included three reports of Cronobacter sakazakii infections and one report of Salmonella Newport infection in infants. All infants were hospitalized and there was one death.

Abbott issued a voluntary recall of powdered infant formula from Similac, Alimentum or EleCare with the following product codes which can be found on the container:

  • the first two digits of the code are 22 through 37, and

  • the code contains K8, SH, or Z2, and

  • the expiration date is April 1, 2022 (APR 2022) or later.

These products are widely distributed across the United States and other countries. Formulas matching the codes provided above could be contaminated with Cronobacter. These bacteria can cause severe foodborne illness in infants with newborns being especially high risk.

“Parents and caregivers with infants on formula should immediately review the formula to ensure they are not using a recalled product,” said Dr. Ayne Amjad, State Health Officer and Commissioner of DHHR’s Bureau for Public Health. “They should seek immediate medical care if their infant has consumed recalled formula and their infant is experiencing signs and symptoms of Cronobacter or Salmonella infection: diarrhea, poor feeding, irritability, vomiting, or blood in their stool.”

Parents and caregivers with a sick infant who has consumed a recalled product are encouraged to keep opened or unopened cans of recalled formula in the instance that the local health department would like to sample the product.

Cronobacter bacteria can cause severe, life-threatening infections such as sepsis or meningitis. Symptoms of sepsis and meningitis include poor feeding, irritability, temperature changes, jaundice, grunting breaths, and abnormal movements. Cronobacter infection may also cause bowel damage and may spread through the blood to other parts of the body. Parents or caregivers noticing any of these symptoms in their children should seek immediate medical care.

Products that do not contain the information listed above are not impacted by this advisory. This advisory does not include liquid formula products or any metabolic deficiency nutrition formulas.

Healthcare providers and health departments are encouraged to report any confirmed cases of Cronobacter or Salmonella who consumed a recalled product to the DHHR’s Office of Epidemiological and Preventive Services at 304-558-5358, extension 2.

Families who purchase infant formula with WIC benefits should reach out to their WIC clinic to return any open or unopened recalled products. WIC clinics must verify the products prior to replacing WIC benefits.

For more information:

FDA:

https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/fda-investigation-cronobacter-and-salmonella-complaints-powdered-infant-formula-february-2022


https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/abbott-voluntarily-recalls-powder-formulas-manufactured-one-plant

Corn in Canada cause of Salmonella Outbreak

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) reports that there are now 110 people from five provinces who have been confirmed as outbreak patients. As of Dec. 21 there were 84 confirmed patients.

“Many of the individuals who became sick reported eating a variety of raw and cooked produce items before their illness. Initially, investigators identified that fresh avocados were reported by many cases before they became ill; however, more information was needed to confirm the source of the outbreak,” according to the PHAC outbreak update.

“As part of the food safety investigation, the CFIA collected different food items from restaurants where ill people dined. Testing found the outbreak strain of Salmonella in an unopened package of Alasko brand frozen whole kernel corn. Traceback findings identified Alasko as the common brand of frozen corn consumed at various foodservice establishments by individuals who became sick. Based on the investigation findings to date, the outbreak is linked to Alasko brand frozen whole kernel corn.”

Outbreak patients have been identified in five provinces: British Columbia with 42, Alberta with 49, Saskatchewan with 4, Manitoba with 13, and Ontario with 2. The illnesses reported in Ontario are related to travel to Alberta and British Columbia, according to the public health agency.

Patients documented so far became sick between early September 2021 and late December 2021. Four individuals have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 1 and 89 years of age. The majority of cases, 64 percent, are female.

Salame Sticks cause Salmonella outbreak

A total of 34 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- were reported from 10 states. The true number of sick people in this outbreak was likely much higher than the number reported, and this outbreak may not have been limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from September 18, 2021, to October 30, 2021. Sick people ranged in age from 1 to 75 years, with a median age of 8. Most of the sick people (79%) were younger than 18, and 58% were female. Of 27 people with information available, 7 were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. Among 27 people interviewed, 26 (96%) reported eating salami sticks and 25 (93%) reported eating or maybe eating Citterio brand Premium Italian-Style Salame Sticks.

California officials found Salmonella in two unopened packages of Citterio brand Premium Italian-Style Salame Sticks that they collected for testing. WGS identified in these products a different strain of Salmonella (Salmonella Derby) that was not closely related to samples from sick people. PulseNet did not find any illnesses caused by this strain of Salmonella Derby.

WGS analysis of bacteria from 28 people’s samples, two salami stick samples, and one raw ground pork sample predicted resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, fosfomycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory is currently underway. Most people with Salmonella illness recover without antibiotics. However, if antibiotics were needed, this resistance was unlikely to affect the choice of antibiotic used to treat most people.

On November 10, 2021, Euro Foods recalled approximately 119,091 pounds of Citterio brand Premium Italian-Style Salame Sticks products.

Nearly 900 sick with Salmonella in US

Since the last update on October 29, 2021, 84 more sick people were added to this outbreak. As of November 12, 2021, 892 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 38 states and Puerto Rico (see map). Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to October 25, 2021 (see timeline).
Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 101 years, with a median age of 37, and 58% are female. Of 571 people with information available, 183 (32%) have been hospitalized.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Whole genome sequencing of bacteria from 788 people’s samples did not predict any antibiotic resistance. Five people’s samples were predicted to be resistant to one or more of the following antibiotics: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, and ceftriaxone, gentamicin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing of three people’s samples by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory also found no resistance. Most people with Salmonella illness recover without antibiotics. However, if antibiotics are needed, this resistance is unlikely to affect the choice of antibiotic used to treat most people because it is rare.

FDA published a list of retail establishments that received product recalled by Keeler Family Farms and a list of retail establishments that received product recalled by ProSource Produce LLC. These lists represent the best information currently available to the FDA; however, they may not include all retail establishments that have received the recalled product or may include retail establishments that did not actually receive the recalled product. It is important that you use the product-specific information, available on the Keeler Family Farms recall announcement and the ProSource Produce LLC recall announcement, in addition to these lists of retail stores, when you check the food you have to see if it has been recalled.

FDA has posted a list of additional recalls being conducted by companies that may have received recall onions from ProSource Produce LLC and Keeler Family Farms. This list includes recalls conducted by companies that further processed the onions by using them as ingredients in new products or by repackaging them.

ProSource Produce LLC has voluntarily recalled red, yellow, and white onions imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, with import dates from July 1, 2021, through August 31, 2021. Additional descriptors used for these onion types may include, but are not limited to, jumbo, colossal, medium, summer and sweet onions. Additional recall information will be made public as soon as it is available from ProSource Inc.

The onions were distributed to wholesalers, broadline foodservice customers, and retail or grocery stores in:

  • 50 lb., 25 lb., 10 lb., 5 lb., 3 lb., and 2 lb. mesh sacks
  • 50 lb., 40 lb., 25 lb., 10 lb., and 5 lb. cartons

And by the following distributors and/or under the following brands:

  • Big Bull
  • Peak Fresh Produce
  • Sierra Madre
  • Markon First Crop.
  • Markon Essentials
  • Rio Blue
  • ProSource
  • Rio Valley
  • Sysco Imperial

Keeler Family Farms has recalled red, yellow, and white whole, fresh onions imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, with import dates from July 1, 2021, through August 25, 2021. The onions were distributed in 25lb and 50lb mesh sacks. They contain a label that is marked as “MVP (product of MX)”.

Additional details regarding the recalled products are available on the Keeler Family Farms recall announcement.

Recalls have also been initiated by companies that sold recalled onions or products containing the recalled onions.

Salame Sticks, Crab and Onions with Salmonella

Salame Sticks:  As of October 22, 2021, 20 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- have been reported from eight states – California 8, Illinois 2, Kansas 1, Michigan 3, Minnesota 3, New Jersey 1, New York 1 and Virginia 1. Illnesses started on dates ranging from September 18, 2021, to October 3, 2021

Sick people range in age from 2 to 75 years, with a median age of 11. Most of the sick people (80%) are younger than 18, and 65% are female. Of 11 people with information available, 3 have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

CDC is advising not to eat, sell, or serve Citterio brand Premium Italian-Style Salame Sticks regardless of where they were purchased.

Crab:  According the the Maine CDC and press reports, two people were hospitalized after a salmonella outbreak linked to crabmeat from Hardie’s Crabmeat in Deer Isle, officials said. Maine CDC is investigating a total of five cases linked to the outbreak.

The cases include four Maine residents and one New Hampshire resident.

Maine CDC and the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry discovered the crabmeat was likely contaminated during preparation and packaging. Health officials recommend packages of Hardie’s Crabmeat purchased between June 15 and Aug. 15 be thrown away.

Onions: The CDC reported a few moments ago that as of October 18, 2021, 652 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 37 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to September 30, 2021.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 97 years, with a median age of 37, and 57% are female. Of 417 people with information available, 129 (31%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

FDA conducted a traceback investigation and identified ProSource Inc. as a common supplier of imported onions to many of the restaurants where sick people ate. One of these clusters occurred in a restaurant where investigators identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg in a condiment container with leftover lime and cilantro. The sick person reported that the condiment cup had also contained onions, although none were left when the condiment was tested. FDA is working to determine if other suppliers of onions may be linked to this outbreak or if there is a common supplier of onions in Chihuahua, Mexico.

First Salmonella Lawsuit filed against Onion Supplier linked to Nationwide Outbreak 

(San Antonio, Texas) The first lawsuit has been filed by Ching-yi Ortiz, on behalf of her minor A.O., against Success Foods Management Group, LLC., Torchy’s Tacos, and ProSource Produce, LLC. In this Salmonella lawsuit linked to onions, the plaintiff is represented by Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, and the Hill Law Firm of San Antonio. The case was filed in the District Court of Bexar County, Texas. Cause #2021C121491

On August 21, 2021, the plaintiff (A.O.) ate dinner at Torchy’s Tacos, located at 18210 Sonterra Place, San Antonio, TX 78258. A week later, he began to experience exhaustion and a headache. His symptoms progressed over the next ten days with increasing intensity. He developed a fever, diarrhea, and sharp pain in his lower back. He was taken to the Prestige Emergency Room on September 3, 2021, but an examination failed to yield a diagnosis.

On September 7, 2021, A.O. was in such intense pain he could not walk or sit up. Due to the severity of symptoms, he was taken to the Methodist Children’s Hospital where he received a diagnosis of Salmonella Oranienburg infection and began treatment for complications in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

The Salmonella Oranienburg infection caused A.O. to develop sepsis, organ failure, pneumonia, acidosis, thrombocytopenia, a pericardial effusion, and interstitial emphysema.  He also felt extreme pain as the infection reached the bones around his sacroiliac joint. Currently, A.O. continues to be treated daily with long term IV antibiotics for Salmonella Oranienburg, which was found in his blood, urine, and stool. His treatment is ongoing as the physicians address his related complications.

As of October 18, 2021, the CDC reported that 652 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 37 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to September 30, 2021. Of those sickened, 129 have been hospitalized.

“A.O. is one of the 652 people with Salmonella Oranienburg linked to the consumption of onions,” stated food safety attorney, Bill Marler of Marler Clark. “In 28 years representing victims of foodborne illness, A.O. is one of the sickest Salmonella cases I have seen for someone that survived,” added Marler.

The FDA conducted a traceback investigation and identified ProSource Inc. as a common supplier of imported onions to many of the restaurants where sick people ate.  They are working to determine if other suppliers of onions may be linked to this outbreak or if there is a common supplier of onions in Chihuahua, Mexico.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. We have brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart. If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Salmonella Oranienburg tied to Onions sickens 652 in 37 states

The CDC reported a few moments ago that as of October 18, 2021, 652 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 37 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to September 30, 2021.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 97 years, with a median age of 37, and 57% are female. Of 417 people with information available, 129 (31%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 193 people with information, 145 (75%) reported eating or maybe eating raw onions or dishes likely containing raw onion before they became sick. Several ill people reported eating at the same restaurants, indicating they may be part of illness clusters. These clusters can provide clues about what food item may be making people sick. If several unrelated ill people ate or shopped at the same location of a restaurant or store within several days of each other, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there. States identified 20 illness clusters at restaurants where onions were served. Information from these clusters shows that many ill people ate raw onions.

FDA conducted a traceback investigation and identified ProSource Inc. as a common supplier of imported onions to many of the restaurants where sick people ate. One of these clusters occurred in a restaurant where investigators identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg in a condiment container with leftover lime and cilantro. The sick person reported that the condiment cup had also contained onions, although none were left when the condiment was tested. FDA is working to determine if other suppliers of onions may be linked to this outbreak or if there is a common supplier of onions in Chihuahua, Mexico.

Salmonella Enteritidis Outbreak over after 36 sick and 12 hospitalized

A total of 36 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis were reported from 11 states. The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from February 21, 2021, to August 16, 2021 (see timeline). Sick people ranged in age from 1 to 83 years, with a median age of 38 years, and 57% were female. Of 32 people with information available, 12 were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. Of the 27 people interviewed, 14 (52%) reported preparing and eating frozen breaded stuffed chicken products. They bought different brands of raw frozen breaded stuffed chicken products from multiple stores.

Public health investigators used the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that were part of this outbreak. CDC PulseNet manages a national database of DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. DNA fingerprinting is performed on bacteria using a method called whole genome sequencing (WGS).

WGS showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples were closely related genetically. This suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from the same food.

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture collected five raw frozen breaded stuffed chicken products from a grocery store where a sick person purchased these products. Testing identified the outbreak strain in two samples of Kirkwood’s Chicken Cordon Bleu. USDA-FSIS and Indiana officials collected unopened packages of Kirkwood Chicken, Broccoli and Cheese from a sick person’s house for testing and identified the outbreak strain in the product. USDA-FSIS investigated and found that these products were produced at facility P-2375.

The following frozen, raw chicken products that are breaded, pre-browned, and stuffed have been recalled:

  • Dutch Farms Chicken with Broccoli & Cheese (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Milford Valley Chicken with Broccoli & Cheese (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Milford Valley Chicken Cordon Bleu (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Kirkwood Raw Stuffed Chicken, Broccoli & Cheese (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Kirkwood Raw Stuffed Chicken Cordon Bleu (lot code BR 1056; best if used by Feb 25 2023)

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