About Salmonella

From the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks.

About Salmonella Blog

A History of Salmonella Lawsuits

The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have many years of experience working with clients on Salmonella outbreak lawsuits.

Salmonella is one of the most common intestinal infections in the United States. Salmonellosis (the disease caused by Salmonella) is the second most common foodborne illness.

It is estimated that:

· 1.4 million cases of salmonellosis occur each year in the U.S.

· 95% of those cases are foodborne-related

· Approximately 220 of each 1000 cases result in hospitalization and eight of every 1000 cases result in death

· About 500 to 1,000 or 31% of all food-related deaths are caused by Salmonella infections each year

Salmonella infection occurs when the bacteria are ingested, typically from food derived from infected food-animals, but it can also occur by ingesting the feces of an infected animal or person. Food sources include raw or undercooked eggs/egg products, raw milk or raw milk products, contaminated water, meat and meat products, and poultry. Raw fruits and vegetables contaminated during slicing have been implicated in several salmonella outbreaks.

The Marler Clark Salmonella lawyers have unmatched experience representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. We have represented thousands of Salmonella victims and are the only lawyers in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on plaintiff foodborne illness litigation.

Our Salmonella lawyers have represented victims of notable Salmonella outbreaks such as the 2004 Sheetz and Coronet Foods tomato Salmonella outbreak, the 2009 PCA peanut Salmonella outbreak, and the 2011 Cargill ground turkey antibiotic-resistant Salmonella outbreak. Contact us today to learn more about our services.

Salmonella Outbreak Lawsuits


Salmonella outbreak hits 592 in 36 states

Illnesses began May 30, 2021 and now has spread to 36 states.

As of October 14, 2021, 592 people infected with the outbreak strain of SalmonellaOranienburg have been reported from 36 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to September 29, 2021.

Texas, Oklahoma, Virginia, Maryland, and Illinois are hardest hit.

Alabama 3, Arkansas 12, California 8, Colorado 1, Connecticut 4, Florida 5, Georgia 2, Illinois 34, Indiana 1, Iowa 3, Kansas 10, Kentucky 9, Louisiana 4, Maryland 45, Massachusetts 11, Michigan 9, Minnesota 22, Mississippi 2, Missouri 10, Nebraska 8, New Jersey 5, New Mexico 8, New York 5, North Carolina 11, North Dakota 4, Ohio 6, Oklahoma 92, Oregon 2, Pennsylvania 6, South Carolina 3, South Dakota 7, Tennessee 10, Texas 149, Utah 3, Virginia 54, and Wisconsin 24.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 97 years, with a median age of 36, and 57% are female. Of 363 people with information available, 116 (32%) have been hospitalized and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Colorado sushi sickens 102 with Salmonella Thompson

The CDC reported today, as of October 7, 2021, 102 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Thompson have been reported from 14 states.  The majority of sick people are either Colorado residents or reported traveling to Colorado in the week before they got sick. Only two people did not report travel to Colorado in the week before they got sick. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 11, 2021, to September 7, 2021.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 to 85 years, with a median age of 39, and 53% are female. Of 89 people with information available, 19 have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Colorado state health officials and FDA traced the source of seafood served at restaurants and sold at grocery stores in Colorado where sick people ate or shopped. FDA determined that Northeast Seafood Products of Denver, Colorado, was the supplier of seafood to most of these locations.

During an FDA inspection of the Northeast Seafood Products facility, FDA collected environmental samples and identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Thompson in the facility.

On October 8, 2021, Northeast Seafood Products of Denver, Colorado, recalled certain types of seafood processed at their facility since October 7, 2021, including Haddock, Monkfish, Bone-in Trout, Grouper, Red Snapper, Red Rock Cod, Ocean Perch, Pacific Cod, Halibut, Coho Salmon, Atlantic Salmon Portions, Lane Snapper, Tilapia, All Natural Salmon Fillet, Pacific Sole, and Farm Raised Striped Bass.

"Mystery" Salmonella Outbreak sickens 419 with 66 hospitalized

The CDC reports today that since the last update on September 23, 2021, 140 more people were added to this outbreak. As of September 29, 2021, 419 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 35 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 19, 2021, to September 14, 2021.

Alabama 1, Arkansas 8, California 6, Connecticut 4, Florida 5, Georgia 2, Illinois 28, Indiana 1, Iowa 1, Kansas 9, Kentucky 9, Louisiana 4, Maryland 22, Massachusetts 10, Michigan 6, Minnesota 20, Mississippi 2, Missouri 5, Nebraska 6, New Jersey 5, New Mexico 8, New York 3, North Carolina 7, North Dakota 2, Ohio 5, Oklahoma 63, Oregon 1, Pennsylvania 4, South Carolina 2, South Dakota 7, Tennessee 2, Texas 111, Utah 2, Virginia 38 and Wisconsin 10.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 91 years, with a median age of 37, and 56% are female. Of 214 people with information available, 66 (31%) have been hospitalized and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local officials have collected food items from some of the restaurants where sick people ate. The outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg was found in a sample taken from a takeout condiment cup containing cilantro and lime. The sick person reported that the condiment container also contained onions, but none were left in the cup when it was tested.

The CDC reports that because multiple food items were present in the container and in the sample that was tested, it is not possible to know which food item was contaminated. We are using this information in conjunction with other available information to help narrow the list of possible foods linked to illness.

Salmonella Outbreak likely linked to Cilantro

According to the CDC, n September 2, 2021, CDC identified an outbreak of 20 Salmonella Oranienburg infections. Since then, the outbreak has grown rapidly.

As of September 21, 2021, 284 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 29 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from August 3, 2021 to September 13, 2021.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 89 years, with a median age of 35, and 59% are female. Of 86 people with information available, 26 have been hospitalized and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local public health officials are interviewing people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. CDC is analyzing the data and has not identified a specific food item as a potential source of this outbreak. Several groups of people (“subclusters”) at restaurants in multiple states have been identified. These subclusters are groups of people who do not know one another who ate at the same restaurant and got sick. Investigating these subclusters can sometimes help identify a food item eaten by all of the sick people that could be the source of the outbreak.

However, The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) shows that of the 275 Salmonella Oranienburg uploaded, 274 Whole Genome Sequence (WGS) “matches” are human and one is cilantro – so, what’s up public health?

Backyard Chickens still making people sick

As of August 31, 2021, a total of 863 people infected with one of the outbreak strains have been reported from 47 states and the District of Columbia.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from December 15, 2020, to August 8, 2021.

Age information was available for 860 people. Their ages range from less than 1 to 97 years, with a median age of 36 years, and 220 (26%) are young children under 5 years. Of 842 people with sex information available, 493 (59%) are female. Of 617 people with information available, 203 (33%) have been hospitalized. Two deaths have been reported, one from Indiana and one from Virginia.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local public health officials are interviewing people about the animals they came into contact with the week before they got sick. Of the 527 people interviewed, 365 (69%) reported contact with backyard poultry before getting sick.

Fratelli Beretta antipasto tied to Salmonella Infantis and/or Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak

Fratelli Beretta USA, Inc., a Mount Olive, N.J. establishment, is recalling approximately 862,000 pounds of uncured antipasto products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Infantis and/or Salmonella Typhimurium, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ready-to-eat (RTE) uncured antipasto meat trays were produced on February 28, 2021 through August 15, 2021. The following products are subject to recall:

24-oz. trays containing two 12-oz packages of “Fratelli Beretta UNCURED ANTIPASTO PROSCIUTTO, SOPPRESSATA, MILANO SALAMI & COPPA” with best by dates of AUG 27 21 through FEB 11 22 and UPC code 073541305316.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 7543B” printed on the packaging next to the best by date. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

FSIS has been working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and public health partners to investigate a multistate outbreak of 36 Salmonella Typhimurium and Infantis illnesses in 17 states, with onset dates ranging from May 9 through July 27, 2021. Some ill people reported eating Fratelli Beretta brand uncured antipasto before they got sick and the traceback investigation confirmed that some of the ill people purchased uncured antipasto trays produced by Fratelli Beretta USA, Inc. FSIS continues to work with the CDC and state and local public health partners on this investigation to determine if additional products are linked to illness. FSIS will provide updated information if it becomes available.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 6 hours to 6 days after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

Salmonella Outbreak linked to Ground Turkey from Plainville Brands

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert for approximately 211,406 pounds of raw ground turkey products, produced by Plainville Brands, LLC, a Pennsylvania establishment, due to concerns the products may have caused Salmonella Hadar illness. A recall was not requested because it is believed that the products are no longer available for consumers to purchase.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase. Retail locations that may receive returned product from consumers should destroy this product immediately.

The raw ground turkey products were produced on December 18, 2020 through December 29, 2020. The following products are subject to the public health alert:

  • 1-lb. packages of Nature’s Promise Free from 94% LEAN | 6% FAT Ground Turkey with Use by/freeze/sell by date of 1/1/21, 1/3/21,1/4/21, 1/8/21 and 1/10/21 on the front of the package.
  • 1-lb. packages of Wegman 94% LEAN | 6% FAT Ground Turkey with Use by/freeze/sell by date of 1/3/21, 1/4/21, 1/8/21 and 1/10/21 on the front of the package.
  • 3-lb. packages of Wegman 94% LEAN | 6% FAT Ground Turkey with Use by/freeze/sell by date of 1/3/21, 1/4/21, 1/8/21 and 1/10/21 on the front of the package.
  • 1-lb. packages of Plainville Farms Ground White Turkey 93% | 7% Fat with Use by/freeze/sell by date of 1/10/21 on the front of the package.

The products bear establishment number EST. P-244 inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

FSIS and its public health partners, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), public health and regulatory officials are investigating a multistate outbreak of 28 Salmonella Hadar illnesses in 12 states with onset dates ranging from December 28, 2020 through March 4, 2021. The traceback investigation for one case patient identified the patient consumed ground turkey produced by Plainville Brands, LLC. An intact, unopened package of Plainville Brands’ ground turkey collected from this case-patient’s home tested positive for Salmonella Hadar and was closely related genetically to the sample from the patient. Evidence collected to date does not link all illnesses to this establishment. Based on the continuing investigation, additional product from other establishments may be involved. FSIS continues to work with CDC and state and local public health partners on this investigation and will provide updated information as it becomes available.

2020 Salmonella Outbreaks

 

Salmonella – Wood Ear Mushrooms

A total of 55 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Stanley were reported from 12 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 21, 2020, to September 19, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from 2 to 74 years, with a median age of 28. Fifty-seven percent of ill people were female. Of 48 ill people with information available, 6 hospitalizations were reported. No deaths were reported.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback information showed that wood ear mushrooms distributed by Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc., were the likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 23 people with information, 22 (96%) reported eating ramen at a restaurant in the week before their illness started. Several people reported eating at the same ramen restaurants, showing they may have been part of illness clusters.

A foodborne illness cluster is defined as two or more people who do not live in the same household who report eating at the same restaurant location, attending a common event, or shopping at the same location of a grocery store in the week before becoming ill. Investigating illness clusters can provide critical clues about the source of an outbreak. If several unrelated ill people ate or shopped at the same location of a restaurant or store within several days of each other, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there.

Five illness clusters were identified at restaurants serving ramen in three states. Ten (91%) of the 11 ill people linked to restaurant clusters reported eating wood ear mushrooms or ramen containing wood ear mushrooms in the week before their illness started.

FDA and states conducted a traceback investigation from four of the restaurants with illness clusters to identify the source of the wood ear mushrooms eaten by ill people. Traceback determined that Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc., supplied wood ear mushrooms (dried fungus) to these restaurants.

On September 23, 2020, Wismettac Asian Foods recalled dried fungus due to possible Salmonella contamination. On October 1, 2020, the California Department of Public Health identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Stanley in recalled dried fungus samples.

Salmonella – Peaches

A total of 101 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis were reported from 17 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 29, 2020, to August 27, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from 1 to 92 years, with a median age of 43. Sixty-four percent of ill people were female. Of 90 ill people with available information, 28 hospitalizations were reported. No deaths were reported.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicated that peaches packed or supplied by Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Company were the likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 62 people with information, 50 (81%) reported eating fresh peaches in the week before their illness started. This percentage was significantly higher than results from a survey of healthy people in which 20% reported eating peaches in the week before they were interviewed. Of the 40 people who reported information on how the peaches were packaged, 25 (63%) reported buying loose peaches and the remaining 15 reported buying pre-bagged peaches.

The FDA and regulatory officials in several states collected records from grocery stores where ill people reported buying peaches. These records showed that loose and bagged peaches distributed by Wawona Packing Company, LLC, were sold at multiple grocery stores where ill people bought peaches.

On August 22, 2020, Prima Wawona recalled bagged and bulk, or loose, peaches that they supplied to retailers nationwide. See FDA’s notice for a list of recalled products. Recalled products are past their shelf life and should no longer be available in stores.

Salmonella – Onions

A total of 1,127 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport were reported from 48 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 19, 2020, to September 11, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from less than 1 to 102 years, with a median age of 41. Fifty-eight percent of ill people were female. Of 705 ill people with information available, 167 people were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence showed that red onions from Thomson International Inc. were the likely source of this outbreak. Other onion types (such as white, yellow, or sweet yellow) were also likely to be contaminated because the onions were grown and harvested together.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Ninety-one percent of people reported eating onions or foods likely containing onions in the week before their illness started. Of the 208 people who were asked what types of onions they ate, 137 (66%) ate red onions, 130 (63%) ate white onions, and 110 (53%) ate yellow onions. Most ill people reported eating more than one type of onion.

FDA and states reviewed records where ill people purchased or ate onions and foods containing onions. This traceback investigation identified Thomson International Inc. as the likely source of red onions.

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) also investigated an outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections in Canada that was related genetically by WGS to the U.S. outbreak. Their investigation identified red onions from Thomson International Inc. as the likely source of their outbreak.

On August 1, 2020, Thomson International Inc. recalled all red, yellow, white, and sweet yellow onions because they may be contaminated with Salmonella. Other companies also recalled onions or foods made with recalled onions.

Salmonella tainted Mushrooms sicken 41 in Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, New Jersey, New York City, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin

As of September 24, 2020, a total of 41 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Stanley have been reported from 10 states – Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, New Jersey, New York City, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 21, 2020, to August 26, 2020. Ill people range in age from 2 to 74 years, with a median age of 27. Sixty-two percent of ill people are female. Of 32 ill people with information available, 4 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic and traceback information show that wood ear mushrooms distributed by Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc., are the likely source of this outbreak.

The California Department of Public Health collected dried fungus at one of the restaurants linked to an illness cluster for testing. Testing identified Salmonella in a sample of dried fungus distributed by Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc. WGS analysis is being done to determine if the Salmonella identified in the dried fungus is the same as the Salmonella from ill people.

On September 24, 2020, Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc., issued a recallof all Shirakiku imported dried fungus after the California Department of Public Health found Salmonella in the product.

Restaurants should not sell or serve recalled wood ear mushrooms distributed by Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc.

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